Golfo Aranci to Civitavecchia Ferry

The Golfo Aranci Civitavecchia ferry route connects Sardinia with Rome. Currently there is just the 1 ferry company operating this ferry service, Corsica Ferries. The crossing operates up to 3 times each week with sailing durations from around 6 hours 30 minutes.

Golfo Aranci Civitavecchia sailing durations and frequency may vary from season to season so we’d advise doing a live check to get the most up to date information.

Golfo Aranci - Civitavecchia Ferry Operators

  • Corsica Ferries
    • 3 Sailings Weekly 6 hr 30 min
    • Get price

Golfo Aranci Guide

Located on the island of Sardinia, the Italian town of Golfo Aranci is in the Province of Olbia-Tempio and is around 200 km to the north of Cagliari and 13 km to the north east of Olbia. It also lies on the gulf that is located on the north eastern coast of Sardinia. There are two possible meanings for the name Golfo Aranci. The first centres around a shipwreck that was carrying oranges and the second is linked to the Sardinian term "granci' which are crabs that can be found in the area. Of the two, the second is perhaps the most plausible. Many visitors to the town visit the beaches found on the gulf itself, however, the town's beaches are also beautiful and include Cala Moresca, Cala Greca, Cala Sabina and the spiaggia Bianca. Also located nearby is the island of Tavolara, which is a marine reserve, and the beautiful Capo Coda Cavallo. Finally, the islands crystal clear, warm waters make it a haven for visitors who want to engage in water sports, especially scuba diving.

From the port connections are made to Italy via daily ferries to the ports of Civitavecchia, Livorno and Fiumicino. Facilities at this small port are limited to a departure lounge, café and a small convenience store.

Civitavecchia Guide

The Italian city of Civitavecchia lies on the Tyrrhenian Sea coast in the Lazio region of the country. The city, which is home to just under 60,000 residents, is home to a cruise and ferry port and is located around 80 km to the north west of Rome. The city can trace its port's history back over one thousand years to 101-108 AD, when the Emperor Trajan ordered the port of Centumcellae to be built in order to accommodate deepwater shipping for the Roman capital. After this period, they fell under the rule of a number of different Counts and Popes.

In the city visitors will find examples of restored medieval and Baroque structures which includes the large Forte Michelangelo which is a fortress that was commissioned by pope Giulio II in the early 16th century and the 17th century defensive walls behind the port. The wall forms one side of the Lungoporto Gramsci which is an elevated pedestrian walkway. From here there are excellent views to be had of the cruise ships and ferry basins in the port.

Car and passenger ferries link Civitavecchia to Sardinia, Sicily, and other destinations within Italy and abroad.