Book a Stockholm Ferry

Stockholm ferries connect Sweden with Estonia, Finland, Aland, Latvia & Russia with crossings available to Tallinn (in Estonia), Helsinki & Turku (in Finland), Langnas & Mariehamn (in Aland), Riga (in Latvia) & St Petersburg (in Russia). Stockholm Ferry crossings are operated by Tallink Silja, Viking Line & St Peter Line and depending on time of year you’ll find a choice of up to 19 ferry crossings daily.

There are up to 19 ferry crossings daily from Stockholm with sailing durations starting from 5 hours 25 minutes. Our Stockholm ferry summary provides a good guide but for the latest sailing information use our fare search.

Stockholm

Click for map

Stockholm Ferry Alternatives

Stockholm Ferry Services

  • Tallink Silja
    • 7 Sailings Weekly 15 hr 30 min
    • Get price
  • St Peter Line
    • 1 Sailing Weekly 16 hr 30 min
    • Get price
  • Tallink Silja
    • 7 Sailings Weekly 16 hr 10 min
    • Get price
  • Viking Line
    • 7 Sailings Weekly 16 hr 40 min
    • Get price
  • St Peter Line
    • 1 Sailing Weekly 18 hr
    • Get price
  • Tallink Silja
    • 14 Sailings Weekly 10 hr 30 min
    • Get price
  • Viking Line
    • 14 Sailings Weekly 10 hr 35 min
    • Get price
  • Tallink Silja
    • 7 Sailings Weekly 6 hr 20 min
    • Get price
  • Viking Line
    • 7 Sailings Weekly 6 hr 15 min
    • Get price
  • Tallink Silja
    • 3 Sailings Daily 5 hr 25 min
    • Get price
  • Viking Line
    • 3 Sailings Daily 5 hr 25 min
    • Get price
  • Tallink Silja
    • 7 Sailings Weekly 17 hr
    • Get price
  • St Peter Line
    • 1 Sailing Weekly 39 hr 30 min
    • Get price

Stockholm Guide

The earliest mention of Stockholm in writing dates from 1252, when it was an important post in the iron trade from the mines in Bergslagen. The first part of the name — stock — means log, while the last part — holm — means islet or small island. The full origin of the name is disputed. The city is said to have been founded by Birger Jarl in order to protect Sweden from invasion from the sea by foreign navies and to stop pillage of the cities such as Sigtuna on Lake Mälaren. The first building at Stockholm was a fortification for the purpose of controlling the traffic between the Baltic Sea and Mälaren. Under the leadership of Magnus Ladulås Stockholm developed into an important trade city in the following decades, advanced through relations with Lübeck of the Hansa league. In 1270 Stockholm appears in historical documents as a city and in 1289 it was described as the most populated city in the Swedish region.